Why do I feed MYself What I'd Never Feed My child?

Endurance Wellness Coaching

I had a mental crisis while eating frozen yogurt (yes, I eat frozen yogurt).

I sat with my eight-month-old son, eating my toffee-flavored fro-yo, and thought about giving him a bite. Then, I stopped myself. My yogurt was sweetened with sucralose, which can cause GI distress (not to mention potential thyroid issues with long-term consumption), and I was not about to give my baby a tummy ache!

My brother has some sugar-sweetened, vanilla flavored frozen yogurt, and our friend was enjoying her dairy-free coconut gelato. Of course, I wasn’t going to give the baby a bite of either of those! They had way too much sugar, something my little one hadn’t had yet as part of his carefully prepared, whole food, fruit-veggie-and-meat-full diet.

Then, the words of a great fellow trainer echoed in my head: “when did it become okay for us to start poisoning ourselves?”

We protect our babies by feeding them the best foods and filtered water, monitoring every substance they put into their mouths. Even before they were born, we seriously limited our caffeine intake, cut out alcohol, and religiously took our prenatal vitamins. At some point, the strictness fades. We give them a bite of cake, a lick of our ice cream cone, and the breading on our fried chicken. Somehow, in our heads, there comes a time where those foods that were huge no-no’s for our growing babies become not-that-bad for our toddlers, kids, and teenagers.

I was agonizing over the choice to feed my son something that I was shoveling into my mouth without a second thought. I know the effects of added sugar. I don’t plan on giving it to my child any time soon. He doesn’t even have plain fruit; it’s always mixed with a vegetable! For his first birthday, I plan on making him a wheat-less, rice-less carrot cake, sweetened with pears. In all actuality, the birthday cake is for the adult party-goers, not the baby.

Let that sink in. I’ll be making a birthday cake for the family and friends attending my son’s birthday that I would never in a million years feed my son. WHAT?! I don’t know at what point it becomes alright to start giving him a little sugar, some trans fats here and there, and dash of artificial colors (things I know sneak their way into my diet), but how do we pinpoint the moment it becomes okay to start giving our children these nasties? Is it the convenience? Do we forget why we were avoiding them? I really couldn’t tell you.

I’m not saying I’ll never let my four-year-old have cake at his friend’s birthday party. He’ll have pie for Thanksgiving. We’ll even go out for a pizza on occasion! But I never want to lose the mindfulness I have for him now, and I’d like to hold on to that mindfulness for my own life.I had a mental crisis while eating frozen yogurt.

I sat with my eight-month-old son, eating my toffee-flavored fro-yo, and thought about giving him a bite. Then, I stopped myself. My yogurt was sweetened with sucralose, which can cause GI distress (not to mention potential thyroid issues with long-term consumption), and I was not about to give my baby a tummy ache!

My brother has some sugar-sweetened, vanilla flavored frozen yogurt, and our friend was enjoying her dairy-free coconut gelato. Of course, I wasn’t going to give the baby a bite of either of those! They had way too much sugar, something my little one hadn’t had yet as part of his carefully prepared, whole food, fruit-veggie-and-meat-full diet.

Then, the words of a great fellow trainer echoed in my head: “when did it become okay for us to start poisoning ourselves?”

We protect our babies by feeding them the best foods and filtered water, monitoring every substance they put into their mouths. Even before they were born, we seriously limited our caffeine intake, cut out alcohol, and religiously took our prenatal vitamins. At some point, the strictness fades. We give them a bite of cake, a lick of our ice cream cone, and the breading on our fried chicken. Somehow, in our heads, there comes a time where those foods that were huge no-no’s for our growing babies become not-that-bad for our toddlers, kids, and teenagers.

I was agonizing over the choice to feed my son something that I was shoveling into my mouth without a second thought. I know the effects of added sugar. I don’t plan on giving it to my child any time soon. He doesn’t even have plain fruit; it’s always mixed with a vegetable! For his first birthday, I plan on making him a wheat-less, rice-less carrot cake, sweetened with pears. In all actuality, the birthday cake is for the adult party-goers, not the baby.

Let that sink in. I’ll be making a birthday cake for the family and friends attending my son’s birthday that I would never in a million years feed my son. WHAT?! I don’t know at what point it becomes alright to start giving him a little sugar, some trans fats here and there, and dash of artificial colors (things I know sneak their way into my diet), but how do we pinpoint the moment it becomes okay to start giving our children these nasties? Is it the convenience? Do we forget why we were avoiding them? I really couldn’t tell you.

I’m not saying I’ll never let my four-year-old have cake at his friend’s birthday party. He’ll have pie for Thanksgiving. We’ll even go out for a pizza on occasion! But I never want to lose the mindfulness I have for him now, and I’d like to hold on to that mindfulness for my own life.